Staff Meeting Success

Staff Meeting Success

Our pre-meeting prayer time went well though all of us admitted we needed to stay focused on what we are coming together for. This week we joked around a lot at first and didn’t start praying until fifteen minutes until the big meeting. We know how easy it is to lose focus and this is not the time to lose focus. We decided to catch up by staying fifteen minutes after the big meeting to catch up on what we missed – not to be legalistic about it all, but to make sure we cover each other and not let our enemy steal from us. Lubbock catering, lawn care and my AC/Heating business will not thrive unless God is in the midst. We were all sure of that.  (By the way, Josh asked that we cover him during the next few months as his Lubbock lawn care business shifted into Lubbock holiday lighting.  Seems like his company does everything.)

As far as the big meeting, we had a guest speaker who came from Dallas to address us. He was a big executive at a hospital there and he wanted to talk about how we can talk about problem areas in staff meetings, but unless we actually monitor the areas where there have been reported problems we won’t get very far. He said that early in his leadership career, many people had told him that one of the nurse’s stations on one of the busiest floors was a real mess. On that floor and at that station specifically, nurses were cursing loudly, not paying attention to call lights, bullying other nurses and saying things that could be sexual harassment, etc. As the leader for that floor and five others, he called a meeting to talk in general about these things. The staff meeting had all of the nurses from all of the floors in it and this man warned them all about not doing these sorts of things. After the meeting, he felt good about the warnings he had given and he had a satisfaction that there would be no more of this unprofessionalism. But he said that he never actually made a trip to see how that one station was functioning – had they listened? Were they acting properly? He didn’t know because he thought that his talk was good enough to make change. In two weeks time, he started hearing rumors that this nurse’s station was doing the same bad things that they had been doing. So, he decided that talk was cheap – he couldn’t just call staff meetings and hope. He had to call staff meetings and then go. He decided to visit that station every day at different times and to observe it from a distance. What did he see? He saw exactly what had been reported to him. After a few days of this observation and specific documentation, he approached the so-called leaders of this station and explained to them that they were the floor workers that the staff meeting had been called about. He showed them his notes from the past few days and demanded that they not only write up several nurses but to warn them that he and others would be watching closely to see if some firings needed to take place. Long story short, this executive ended up having to fire several nurses who refused to change their behavior and this floor became one of the best in the hospital. Basic message to us: Don’t just reprimand problem workers with a general slap on the wrist. Do your own homework about what is going on with employees and do whatever you have to do to make sure that your teams run professionally.

What do you readers think about this? Ever been in a similar situation where you have had business leadership talk a lot about needed changes, but never making them? Ever felt trapped in a job where your fellow workers were doing wrong and making you feel more than uncomfortable? Did you report them? Was anything done?

I know for me that I need to go and see how my small teams of employees were acting while on actual jobs. I think I know they are doing well, but I have had complaints and I never did much to monitor the problems. I won’t just talk anymore. I’ll go Undercover Boss and get rid of problem workers if need be.